Diario Judío México - As of 18 August 2009, Amnesty International considers Jacinta Francisco Marcial a prisoner of conscience.

This appointment recognizes the innocence of Jacinta while declaring her a person imprisoned only for being an indigenous women with limited access to justice. Thus, the world’s largest movement for the defense and protection of human rights calls on the Mexican authorities to free Jacinta immediately and without conditions.

Jacinta, from the Otomi (ñhä-ñhú) indigenous people, from Santiago Mexquititlán, state of Querétaro (Mexico), was condemned to 21 years in prison after being accused of kidnapping six agents of the Federal Investigation Agency (AFI). The agents state that some market vendors kidnapped them during an incident on 26 March 2006. Jacinta is a mother of six and, before spending the last three years in prison, made a living by selling ice cream and juices with his husband in a market stall in downtown Santiago Mexquititlán.

Amnesty International calls on the movement’s millions of members around the world to raise their voices until Jacinta is freed.

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Dear President Calderón:

As an activist for the respect of the rights of all persons, I write to show you my deep concern that the inhabitants of your country have no access to justice.

Jacinta Francisco Marcial, an Otomí indigenous women from Santiago Mexquititlán, state of Querétaro, was condemned to 21 years in prison after being accused of kidnapping six agents of the Federal Investigation Agency (AFI). The agents state that some market vendors kidnapped them in an incident on 26 March 2006. Jacinta is a mother of six and, before spending the last three years in prison, made a living selling ice cream and juices with his husband in a market stall in downtown Santiago Mexquititlán.

Unjust imprisonments must end. The inadequate use of the justice system, as in the case of Jacinta, shows that justice administration in Mexico is far from ensuring the rights of all.

It is worrisome that the most vulnerable persons, such as indigenous populations, women and people living in unfavorable social conditions receive a “second class” justice.

The case of Jacinta, which contains several elements of vulnerability in the face of such a system, brings the Mexican government to face one of the most important challenges to avoid continuous violations of human rights: ensuring the access to justice for all persons.

I urge you to immediately and unconditionally free Jacinta. The irregularities in the process and the false evidence against her keep an innocent person in prison.

Add your voice to free Jacinta Francisco Marcial, click here to sign the petition.